August 2014

Site now SSL by default

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Google recently announced that it is going to start prioritising websites that offer HTTPS by default in its search engine results. At first, the positive effect will be small to give webmasters time to switch to HTTPS, but it will gradually become more of a significant signal. This is a good thing for the internet: SSL doesn't cost much for webhosts, and it makes it more difficult to spy on everyone all the time! The Electronic Frontier Foundation praised the decision calling it a "bold and welcome move to protect users".

I wanted to start offering some of the services I run on my server to other friends and family, and I couldn't easily install the CAcert root on all of their devices, so this seemed like a good time to purchase a cert. The following describes how I configured the various services (Apache, Postfix, Dovecot) to use the new certificate from COMODO.

Introduction to Fail2ban

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Fail2ban is a great little tool for system administration. In a nutshell, it watches your log files for pre-defined patterns and then executes actions if it sees them. Ususally, this is of the form "if there are more than X failed authentication attempts in Y minutes from a single IP address, update the firewall to block the offending IP for Z minutes". The actions are not restricted to updating the firewall with iptables - you can also configure fail2ban to send notification emails, for example.

This is useful for protecting against brute force attacks against services like:

  • SSH (you should be using Publickey authentication if possible which will stop them ever guessing a password, but allowing them to try is still a waste of resources)
  • SASL authentication attempts (Postfix and Dovecot)
  • Login forms for web based services like Roundcube webmail.