Fix for Ethernet Connection Drop on Raspberry Pi

Raspberry_Pi_Ethernet_Port.jpg

The Problem

Today an engineer from BT was fiddling with the junction box outside my house, and my modem dropped connection to my router.

At the time, the router did not automatically force reconnect (my fault, I hadn’t configured it to do so). When I noticed what had happened, I reconnected to the modem. So far so good.

A couple of hours later, I noticed that two of my three Pi (all of which are connected with ethernet cables) had not reconnected to the router. The one that did reconnect is running Raspbmc (XBMC port to Raspberry Pi); the two that did not are running Apache with some bits on top (a mail server, owncloud, and wordpress for this website!).

This is a pain because not only did it take the services offline, but I was unable to SSH to the Pi to correct the problem. Removing and reconnecting the ethernet cables did not work, so in the end I had to pull the power and reboot.

Existing Partial Solutions

I found a thread on the RasPi forums about reconnecting WiFi with a BASH script after a drop. My guess is that Raspbmc includes something similar, but for ethernet, which is why it reconnects and the other two Pi do not:

#!/bin/bash

while true ; do
   if ifconfig wlan0 | grep -q "inet addr:" ; then
      sleep 60
   else
      echo "Network connection down! Attempting reconnection."
      ifup --force wlan0
      sleep 10
   fi
done

The directions on the thread indicated that this script could be run in the background (i.e. sudo network-manager.sh &), and added to the end of /etc/rc.local so that it runs when the system is first booted.

Clearly, this solution needed modification to work for ethernet instead of wifi, but I was also concerned that running a script all the time in the background could be an unnecessary drain on the Pi’s resources. One more thing that I wanted the script to do was tell me what had happened during the time that the Pi was reconnected. These factors led me to create a new script for my particular problem.

My Solution: New BASH Script

This section presents and my script, and how to use it.

Saving a copy of the script

If you don’t already have a subfolder inside your user’s home folder for scripts, create one now:

mkdir ~/bin

Now copy this script into your favourite text editor, and save it as network-monitor.sh inside that folder.

#!/bin/bash

LOGFILE=/home/admin/network-monitor.log

if ifconfig eth0 | grep -q "inet addr:" ;
then
        echo "$(date "+%m %d %Y %T") : Ethernet OK" >> $LOGFILE
else
        echo "$(date "+%m %d %Y %T") : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection." >> $LOGFILE
        ifup --force eth0
        OUT=$? #save exit status of last command to decide what to do next
        if [ $OUT -eq 0 ] ; then
                STATE=$(ifconfig eth0 | grep "inet addr:")
                echo "$(date "+%m %d %Y %T") : Network connection reset. Current state is" $STATE >> $LOGFILE
        else
                echo "$(date "+%m %d %Y %T") : Failed to reset ethernet connection" >> $LOGFILE
        fi
fi

i.e.

nano ~/bin/network-monitor.sh

…then copy & paste, save and exit (Ctrl + X, hit yes when prompted to save). Make sure the long lines don’t get truncated when you copy and paste them over, or the script won’t work!

Note that the script points to a file that will be used as a log on line 3. My username is “admin”; if yours is “pi” then change that line to LOGFILE=/home/pi/network-monitor.log, or replace “pi” with any other username.

Adding ~/bin to your $PATH variable, and making the script executable

Your $PATH variable is a list of places that the shell looks for executables. We need to add the newly added ~/bin so that you don't have to use the full path to the script when you run it. To do this, open ~/.bashrc and add this line to the end:

PATH=$PATH:~/bin

The shell normally reads ~/.bashrc when you log in, but we can tell it to parse it now using this command to that the changes take effect:

source ~/.bashrc

Now we need to make the script executable, e.g.:

chmod +x ~/bin/network-monitor.sh

Initial test

You should now be able to run the script using sudo (i.e. sudo network-monitor.sh). Check the log file with this command:

less ~/network-monitor.log

You should see a date and time stamp from when you ran the script, followed by “Ethernet OK”. If this is what you see, all is well. Press q to quit “less” and return to the command prompt when you are done.

Automating with cron

Cron is a tool that can run scripts at regular intervals, and is very suited for this kind of thing. Luckily, it’s really easy to get started with.

Open the cron configuration file with root privileges:

sudo nano /etc/crontab

Now schedule the script to be run every 5 minutes (or any other interval that you would prefer), by adding this last line to the end of the file (remember to change “admin” if you have a different username):

# /etc/crontab: system-wide crontab
# Unlike any other crontab you don't have to run the `crontab'
# command to install the new version when you edit this file
# and files in /etc/cron.d. These files also have username fields,
# that none of the other crontabs do.

SHELL=/bin/sh
PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

# m h dom mon dow user  command
17 *    * * *   root    cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly
25 6    * * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.d$
47 6    * * 7   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.w$
52 6    1 * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.m$
#

*/5 * * * * root bash /home/admin/bin/network-monitor.sh

If you want the script to run every 10 minutes (or any other multiple of 1 minute), change the first part of the line, e.g. to “*/10″. It’s important to set the script to run with root because the ifup command requires superuser privileges.

Make a cup of tea and come back. Check the log file again, you should see more entries with time stamps that are 5 minutes (or whatever you specified) apart.

Full Test

Now is the time to test your script to see if it will reconnect you when the ethernet connection goes down.

I’d recommend that you have physical access to the Pi when you test this for the first time, just in case you have to pull the power and reboot (very unlikely if everything has worked so far).

Make sure that your Cron interval isn’t set too high or you’ll have to wait ages (5 minutes is about right for testing).

Connect to the Pi via SSH, and issue this command (after you issue it, your SSH session will become unresponsive, but that’s kind of the point!):

sudo ifdown eth0

Wait for at least the amount of time you specified between cron jobs, and then login again. You may actually still be logged in – if you didn’t try and get the Pi to do anything while the ethernet was down, it may not have registered the connection drop.

Check the log file. You should see something like this:

11 10 2013 16:50:01 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 16:55:02 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 17:00:01 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Network connection reset. Current state is inet addr:192.168.1.103 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
11 10 2013 17:10:01 : Ethernet OK

Success! Your Pi can now successfully reconnect to the router. If the router itself was down for a period of time, then you would see something like this in the logs, with the script attempting to reconnect and failing until the router was back up:

11 10 2013 16:50:01 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 16:55:02 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 17:00:01 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Failed to reset ethernet connection
11 10 2013 17:10:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:10:01 : Failed to reset ethernet connection
11 10 2013 17:15:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:15:01 : Failed to reset ethernet connection
11 10 2013 17:20:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:20:01 : Network connection reset. Current state is inet addr:192.168.1.103 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
11 10 2013 17:25:01 : Ethernet OK

Future Improvements

I may do some further work on the script to combine all “Ethernet OK” lines into a single line containing two time stamps, between which the connection was fine, e.g:

11 10 2013 16:35:02 to 11 10 2013 17:00:01 : Ethernet OK
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
11 10 2013 17:05:01 : Network connection reset. Current state is inet addr:192.168.1.103 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0

For now, I’m just glad that it works!

If you think you can improve the script, please let me know, I’d love to hear your suggestions!

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Comments

Roman,

See my reply to the comment above yours - you probably want "allow hotplug" in your config and the ethernet should reconnect.

Sam

My log File is like that........
01 12 2019 12:01:33 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
01 12 2019 12:01:42 : Network connection reset. Current state is
01 12 2019 12:04:04 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
01 12 2019 12:04:18 : Network connection reset. Current state is
01 12 2019 12:28:28 : Ethernet connection down! Attempting reconnection.
01 12 2019 12:28:36 : Network connection reset. Current state is

I am using rpi2 with raspbian strech updated and upgraded....

How to check and resolve the bug

Regards,

This helped me with my ReadyNAS drive (ReadyNASOS 6.10.0 on top of linux debian 8 jessie) not connecting to internet after cable modem auto resets. However, since the ether ports would make connections I changed the "if" to ping a DNS ip address 5 times and check for "5 received". If it didn't then "ifconfig eth0 down" command is given followed by "ifconfig eth0 up" command after waiting 5sec. Once that was done and verified working I disabled the line adding "Ethernet OK" to the log file every 5min when all is well, so the log only gets entries when it can't ping the DNS ip and resets eth0.

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