Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi Print & Scanner Server

Got a spare RasPi knocking around? Why not hook it up to your all-in-one and use it as a handy print and scanner server?

I have previously tried to get my multifunction printer/scanner working with OpenWrt, but ran into difficulty with the scanner. Having tried it with the RasPi, I'm pleased to report that it's as easy as Pi ;)

Print server capability is provided by the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS), and scanner capability is provided by Scanner Access Now Easy (SANE).

Apache ModSecurity Whitelist Generator Script

ModSecurity Logo

This script has been superseded by a commandline utility. Please visit this page for more information

ModSecurity is a Web Application Firewall for Apache. It can monitor all of the traffic that is seen by your web server, including request headers and GET and POST data, and block dodgy requests. ModSecurity itself is actually just a rule engine; the clever part is in the rules you pass to it. Many people use the Open Web Appplication Security Project's (OWASP) Core Rule Set (CRS), an open source set of rules that ModSecurity can use to sift the wheat from the chaff, and foil some common types of attack.

The CRS was written by studying known vulnerabilities and writing rules that would not only have prevented the attacks, but prevented other similar attacks too. Thus, ModSecurity provides a good all-round protection for your web server.

SSL Certificate Signing with CAcert for Raspberry Pi, Ubuntu & Debian

CAcert logo

If you run your own website, email server or other services like OwnCloud at home then you may find yourself in need of a SSL certificate. When you install Apache, it generates a self-signed "snakeoil" certificate that can be used to encrypt your session. However, while this certificate is useful for testing purposes, it falls short in a couple of important ways:

  1. The snakeoil certificate has not been signed by an authority that your browser trusts, so your browser will throw an error when you connect.
  2. The common name on the certificate probably doesn't match your domain name. Another browser error.
  3. Short of manually inspecting the certificate's checksum, you have no guarantee that you are communicating with your own server - it could easily be an imposter using another self-signed certificate.

This tutorial will show you how to generate your own SSL certificate, and get it signed by the community driven SSL certificate signing authority CAcert. Once you have imported the certificate into your browser or into your operating system's root filesystem, your computer will automatically verify the identity of the server and you will enjoy error-free secure communications. Oh, and CAcert is free of charge!

Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 5: Spam Sorting with LMTP & Sieve

This is the fifth and final part of a five part tutorial that will show you how to install a full featured email server on your Raspberry Pi.

This tutorial covers how to automatically sort spam emails into the spam folder using Dovecot’s Local Mail Transfer Protocol (LMTP) and Sieve rules.

The parts are:
The Introduction & Contents Page (read first)
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 1: Postfix
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 2: Dovecot
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 3: Squirrelmail
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 4: Spam Detection with Spamassassin
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 5: Spam Sorting with LMTP & Sieve

Intro

If you followed the previous tutorial, you currently have an email server that automatically scans incoming emails using Spamassassin. However, in its current state, Spam and Ham alike are delivered to the inbox, which is annoying. Since Spamassassin only marks emails based on their spam score, we need to use an external program to handle sorting & delivery.

Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 4: Spam Detection with Spamassassin

Spamassassin Logo

This is the fourth part of a five part tutorial that will show you how to install a full featured email server on your Raspberry Pi. This tutorial covers how to mark emails as spam with Spamassassin.

The parts are:
The Introduction & Contents Page (read first)
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 1: Postfix
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 2: Dovecot
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 3: Squirrelmail
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 4: Spam Detection with Spamassassin
Raspberry Pi Email Server Part 5: Spam Sorting with LMTP & Sieve

How to Install WordPress on a Raspberry Pi

WordPress on Raspberry Pi

This tutorial will show you how to take a vanilla Raspbian image and turn it into a HTTP server hosting one or more WordPress website.

I’ve previously written a few bits and pieces about WordPress, but I’ve never actually covered how to install it on a Raspberry Pi until now.

This was one of the first things I did with my Pi, so I’m going to assume you know very little and try to be as detailed as possible.

The actual WordPress bit is very quick and easy once the ground work is done: wordpress.org has a 5 minute installation guide, but it doesn’t tell you how to do the difficult bits! This tutorial will cover everything you need, from the ground up.

Raspberry Pi Server Preparation

Raspberry Pi Server

This post is essentially a list of changes to the Pi’s default configuration that I would recommend you make before you start using the Pi as a server. These apply regardless of whether you want to use it as a mail server, an Owncloud machine, or a web server running something like WordPress.

I’ll run you through the steps, starting with burning Raspbian to an SD card.

Webalizer: a Free, Open Source Alternative to Google Analytics for Raspberry Pi

webalizer.png

Google Analytics is everywhere. Seriously, everywhere. So much so that Google probably has a complete record of you hopping from site to site during your normal browsing, information that happens to be both extremely valuable to them and a pretty serious invasion of your privacy.

Multiple Websites and Subdomains with SSL/TLS in Apache2: Virtualhosts

Want to host more than one website on your Raspberry Pi, without having to pay for multiple IP addresses? You can do this easily using Apache’s name-based VirtualHost configuration feature.

This feature allows someone to connect to your Raspberry Pi (or other server) and get served different content based on the host header they sent with their request. This is automatic, and the user is none the wiser: they simply type your web address in the header, and your server uses that information to decide which website to display. Unless you tell them, they won’t know the Pi is also hosting other content.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Raspberry Pi